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Scientists claim: widespread fear for UV probably misplaced. We need More sunlight for less cancer!

44 years of study:
Veldhoven, 05.10.2012 (SRF) - A large body of evidence indicates that solar ultraviolet-B (UVB) irradiance and vitamin D reduce the risk of incidence and death for many types of cancer. Therefore, scientists from Nordic countries believe that the widespread fear of chronic solar UV irradiance may be misplaced.

Significantly correlated -The researchers conclude that, for men, the UVB index is significantly inversely correlated with 14 types of internal cancer: bladder, breast, colon, gallbladder, kidney, laryngeal, liver, lung, oral, pancreatic, pharyngeal, prostate, rectal, and small intestine cancer. For women, the same UVB index was inversely correlated with bladder, breast, and colon cancer.

Data of almost 3 million people - The scientists used data on cancer standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) by sex and 54 occupation categories. It is based on 1.4 million male and 1.36 million female cancer cases for 1961-2005 in the five Nordic countries. All this data provided the basis for the ecological study of the role of solar UVB in the risk of many types of cancer at high latitudes (where solar UVB doses are generally high in summer). The results from this study, done by a group of Nordic scientists, generally agree with finding from other studies.

campaigns by anti-sun brigades mislead public leading to cancers"It is well known that sunlight is the natural source for vitamin D in the human body. About 90% of this powerful vitamin is created by the body after sunlight exposure. The other 10% comes from our diet.
Yet, with our modern lifestyle and much less exposure to sunlight the Western world suffers from tremendous deficiency - with an increased chance on diseases as a result. That is the reason this scientists believe that the widespread fear of chronic solar UV irradiance may be misplaced", explains Ad Brand of the Sunlight Research Forum (SRF).

The Sunlight Research Forum (SRF) is a non-profit organisation with its headquarters in theNetherlands. Its aim is to make the latest medical and scientific findings concerning the effects of moderate UV radiation on humans open to the general public.

Source: Acta Oncol 2009;48:646-790.

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